Getting a return from training

In 1959, Kirkpatrick1 first outlined four levels for training evaluation: reactions – ‘liking or feelings for a programme’ learning - ‘principles, facts etc absorbed’ behaviour - ‘using learning on the job’ results - ‘increased production, reduced costs, etc’. For the next 45 years the evaluation of training moved on very patchily in terms of research and new ideas, and poorly in terms of practical application. In 2007, however, the CIPD produced a new 'partnership of learning model' which emphasises the need for all those involved in learning interventions actively to play their part.

Read More »

How to create a PDP that actually achieves something

If you think your performance appraisal process leaves something to be desired and probably sits somewhere between "never done" and "done under duress" just take a look at a few Personal Development Plans! Or should I say "pointless de-motivating plans". So, by our title you can assume that we mean the vast majority of PDPs don’t achieve anything, quite right. In my experience most PDPs end up as highly aspirational, one-sided documents which do little to move anything forward. Why is this so? It is because the vast majority of managers still don’t believe in the value of them, pay little attention to them once the annual appraisal review is out of the way and therefore reduce them to one-sided “some day” pieces of paper full of courses and coaching that often fails to materialise.

Read More »

Hello world!

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

Read More »